Bray retains Clean status in latest IBAL litter survey

The latest survey by business group Irish Business Against Litter shows Bray is again Clean to European Norms, in 28th position in the ranking of 40 towns and cities, up four places on the previous survey. Ennis, Roscommon and last year’s winner Kildare vying for the title of Ireland’s cleanest town, to be announced by Minister Denis Naughten at midday today in the Shelbourne Hotel in Dublin*.

The Taisce report stated:

“In recent years Bray has done just enough to retain Clean status and this was again the case in this survey. A good result, but a long way from the top spot in the rankings which the town once enjoyed. There were notable improvements at the Recycle Facility at Boghall Road and the Community Garden within is clearly a much respected environment.  Major works have taken place at Bray Dart Station / Bus Terminal and the whole area looks very well.  There are two sites in Bray which have stubbornly remained heavily littered for a number of years – Upper Dargle Road and Quinnsborough Car Park.” 

An Taisce surveyed 25 towns and 15 city areas on behalf of IBAL. Of these, none was judged to be a litter blackspot, and only one, Galvone in Limerick, was designated as “seriously littered”. 88% of towns were deemed clean, a slight improvement on the previous year, with 40% adjudged to be cleaner than the European average. In contrast, city areas occupied 6 of the bottom 7 places in the rankings.

Waterford was again the country’s cleanest city, while Tallaght, previously a litter blackspot, climbed to 5th in the rankings and was deemed “Cleaner than European Norms”. Castlebar and Portlaoise progressed strongly in the rankings, but Navan and Carlow both fell to “moderately littered”.

Once again, the roads leading in from Dublin Airport were exceptionally clean, but in general the survey found an increase in litter levels along roads connecting towns, with the majority “moderately littered”. The Bray-Wexford road was free of litter.

According to the survey, 2017 saw falls in the prevalence of fast food wrappers, plastic bottles and dog fouling. Chewing gum, cigarette butts and cans continue to be major sources of litter.

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