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Government slammed for setting Wicklow house prices at €400,000 in a new so-called affordable housing scheme

Wicklow Sinn Féin TD John Brady has slammed the Government after setting Wicklow house prices at €400,000 in a new so-called affordable housing scheme.

Deputy Brady said “The need for genuinely affordable homes to rent and buy were a key issue of the last general election. However, what is proposed by Fianna Fáil, the Greens and Fine Gael in their ‘affordable housing scheme’ is a plan by developers for developers. It will not help first-time buyers’ access more affordable homes. It will simply increase house prices and developers profit margins.”

“The Government’s proposed new housing legislation will include a plan to cap the price of affordable housing using seven different rates across the country. These inflated price caps will mean that so-called affordable homes will be out of reach for most people. The decision to introduce the ‘shared equity’ scheme, and the inclusion of these expensive homes, is more about providing subsidies for developers than homes that are genuinely affordable.”

“The rate for Wicklow is €400,000. I’m not sure in whose world €400,000 for a house is affordable, but it certainly isn’t for ordinary working families. The household salary needed to be able to afford one of these homes will be in the region of between €90,000 and €100,000.

“The government’s decision will cause developers delight, but it will be a source of stress and worry for first-time buyers and young families up and down the country. We have to start putting the interests of families ahead of the interests of developers and international funds.”

“Last year Sinn Féin produced a plan that showed how under a Sinn Féin government we would build 8,000 would be genuinely affordable homes for working people, evenly split between affordable cost rental homes and affordable purchase homes. These affordable homes would be available to purchase for €230,000 or less in Dublin, the commuter belt and other major urban areas.”

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